Ham Lake Fire May 13th, 2007

I apologize to all of my Canadian neighbors for not keeping up on what the Ham Lake Fire is doing up there.  After the fire raged through Sag Lake Trail it jumped the narrows and started burning on the East side of the narrows.  It then continued eastward toward the Granite River near Maraboeuf and spotted some to the north.  The wind has been changing directions constantly and the fire made a major run along the entire northern side of Gunflint Lake the other night.  It also spotted farther to the north of Gunflint and to the south of Saganaga.  I heard today Horseshoe Island was burning but it hasn’t been confirmed.  I also heard some people were being evacuated from Saganaga via helicopters and planes.  I do not know if this is true but the wind has been pushing Southeast today and it very well could be up on the Canadian side of Saganaga.  There has been black smoke surrounding us for the past week so it is hard to tell just where all of the fires are burning.  I will update the blog when I know more for sure.

Things are going ok today for yet another Red Flag Warning Day on the Gunflint Trail.  So far we haven’t had to evacuate anyone so let’s keep outrfingers crossed.  Crews are working hard at changing propane on sprinkler systems, putting up more systems, and trying to keep ahead of the 25 mph gusts of wind that tend to send sparks flying far ahead of the fire.

It’s time to ask Mother Nature for a favor and ask her to bring us some rain.

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Ham Fire May 12, 2007

This entry was actually a second entry on one of the days. It describes in more detail what happened on the 6th of May and into the 7th.

the next day

Anyone who has been following my blog knows the rest of the story.  Mike and the other fire fighters were able to flee the end of the Gunflint Trail without being trapped.  They fought as hard and as long as they could, but it was a battle they could have never won.  They drove away from the fire down the Gunflint Trail feeling defeated and with a sense of loss like no other.

As the sun went down that night we watched the flames of the fire glowing to the north of Gunflint Lake.  We listened to the wind howl all night long, never letting down and we feared the worst.  We heard reports at the briefing in the morning that our lodge was still standing, but others were not as lucky.

On our road, Sag Lake Trail, many of our dear friends and neighbors lost their cabins.  Long time residents of the Gunflint Trail, Frank and Pat Shunn’s home was destroyed.  Cabins that have been around for years were no longer standing.  Around 20 structures in all were lost on Sag Lake Trail, the majority of them cabins.  In their place were charred remains; bed springs, appliances, nails and ash.

Our friends Earl and Anita Cypher, owners of Superior North Outfitters, lost their outfitting building and bunks but their store was spared.  We lost four cabins that were used to house employees and one cabin held all of Theresa’s belongings inside.  Kevlar canoes were melted and Don and Marilyn’s storage shed burned to the ground.  The fire spread and consumed the whole end of the Gunflint Trail.

The landscape has changed.  Things will not ever look the same.  Things will be different in our end of the world.  But different isn’t always necessarily bad.  The forest will green up as soon as it rains and plants will break through the ash.  New growth will occur and the animals remain.  Yesterday we saw mallards in a charred pond, a moose walking on our road, two deer trotting across the Trail and a grouse, all on Sag Lake Trail.  Cabins can be re-built and buildings replaced, but again, lives cannot.

Today is a new day on the Gunflint Trail.  The fire has increased to around 22,000 acres and will no doubt become larger today.  Southwest winds with gusts up to 12-17 miles per hour and temperatures in the 80’s will get the fire cooking.  There will be another prescribed burn today on the north side of Gunflint Lake to keep the fire from spreading too far to the south causing Gunflint Lake homeowners to evacuate.

We are praying and hoping today goes well.  We are thankful to have a place to stay, food to eat, and friends to help us out.  The kids are having fun with their sleep-overs at Baker’s but the novelty of it is beginning to wear off.  They are anxious to return to their beds, their toys and their home.

I wish I could tell them when we could go home.  We still don’t have electricity or phone and with the fire only 5% contained, it isn’t safe.  I showed them pictures of the destruction and explained whose cabins were gone and whose cabins remained.  I told them forest fire is good for the forest and it will look better soon.   I also told them that it doesn’t matter where we live or what we have as long as we have each other.

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Ham Fire May 11, 2007

We experienced another evacuation of the Gunflint Trail.  Marilyn, Ian, Theresa, Abby, Josh and our animals are all safe in Grand Marais.  The community of Grand Marais has been remarkable during this entire event.  The firefighters are doing everything they can to save lives and structures on the Gunflint Trail.

You can reach Voyageur by calling 218-3×0-1xx2 for the time being.  Marilyn will be calling guests with trips booked this week.  It will not be a normal fishing opener this year.

Yesterday the fire made a major run.  It traveled the entire Canadian side of the Gunflint Trail and then south to Mayhew Lake and crossed the Gunflint Trail.  It was a very scary day.

There will be photos available soon at http://www.fire.boreal.org/hamlake so be sure to check it out.  For more fire information visit http://www.boreal.org there are a number of links to follow with information.

Mike, Don and I are still actively helping with the fire fighting efforts and evacuation of the Gunflint Trail.  We all spent the night in our vehicles, Mike and I at Fire Hall number 2 without electricity or telephone service.  It’s been a long week, but we’re hanging in there.

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Ham Lake Fire May 10, 2007

Weather Forecast and Evacuation-

Current time: May 10, 2007 – 7:01 CDT Most Recent Observations at May 10, 2007 – 6:04 CDT 6:04

The current temperature at the Seagull Guard Station is 63 degrees.  Dew Point is 43.5, Humidity 49%, Wind Speed 5 mph from the West, Wind Gusts at 9 mph.

FIRE WEATHER PLANNING FORECAST FOR NE MINNESOTA AND NW WISCONSIN
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DULUTH MN
433 AM CDT THU MAY 10 2007

…RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FOR NORTHEAST MINNESOTA TODAY…

.DISCUSSION…
A COLD FRONT IS APPROACHING NORTHEAST MINNESOTA TODAY. INCREASINGSOUTHWEST WINDS WILL CAUSE TEMPERATURES TO RISE TO THE LOW TO MID 80S ACROSS MOST OF THE AREA. VERY LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES IN THE MID TO UPPER TEENS WILL PREVENT ANY SHOWERS FROM FORMING ALONG THE FRONT…WITH A FEW THUNDERSTORMS SOUTH OF ROUTE 2. WITH THE AIR BEING SO DRY…THERE IS A DANGER OF DRY LIGHTNING AND ABRUPTLY STRONG GUSTS TO 50 MPH WITH SOME OF THESE STORMS. BEHIND THE FRONT…COOLING ALOFT WILL CAUSE WEST…THEN NORTHWEST WINDS TO STRENGTHEN TO 30 MPH WITH SOME GUSTS EVENTUALLY REACHING 40 MPH AS THE AFTERNOON WEARS ON. OVERNIGHT…WINDS WILL BECOME ONSHORE AND IN THE 10 TO 20 MPH RANGE AS TEMPERATURES WILL REMAIN IN THE LOW TO MID 60S ACROSS NORTHEAST MINNESOTA ON FRIDAY. HUMIDITIES WILL RETURN
TO THE LOW TO MID 20S FRIDAY AFTERNOON. LIGHT AND SPOTTY RAIN…
ASSOCIATED WITH IOWA LOW PRESSURE…MAY MOVE INTO THE AREA FRIDAY.

THE COOL AND VERY DRY ONSHORE FLOW WILL KEEP TEMPERATURES IN THE 60S SATURDAY. A WARM FRONT SHOULD LIFT HUMIDITIES AND MAY BRING SOME SPOTTY RAIN SUNDAY…WITH A TROUGH EXPECTED TO MOVE THROUGH MONDAY. ANOTHER HUDSON BAY HIGH WILL RETURN THE AREA TO VERY DRYWEATHER…PLENTY OF SUNSHINE…AND BRISK…GUSTY ONSHORE WINDS TUESDAY AND FOR MUCH OF THE COMING WEEK.

Also on the 10th– mandatory evacuation

Be advised, the Cook County Sheriff’s Department has issued a mandatory evacuation from South Gunflint Lake Road to County Road 92.  This includes, but may not be limited to, South Gunflint Lake Road, Mile O Pine, North Loon Lake Road, Tucker Lake Road, South Loon Lake Road/Loon Lake Lodge Road.  For your safety, please evacuate immediately.

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Ham Lake Fire May 9, 2007

Whack a Mole!

This is my all time favorite carnival game.  You know the one, the mole pops his head up out of a hole and then you try to whack it with a rubber mallet? That was what today was like except it was fires popping up everywhere and planes and firefighters trying to knock them back down.

Mike and I were kept busy patrolling Sag Lake Trail.  The houses with sprinklers required very little attention, the ones without were a completely different story.  We would drive down one driveway to find fire creeping up the hill towards a cabin and then call for a fire truck to come and spray it down.  Then we would head down another road to find another cabin in danger of flames and call for more assistance.  While checking for hot spots near cabins flames were erupting all around us.

We drove up and down the roads while flames consumed the trees.  The smoke was thick, ashes were floating everywhere, and we constantly had to keep an eye out for falling trees and branches.  Fire crews on other roads at the end of the Gunflint Trail did the same thing and were constantly in harms way.

Again we were lucky.  No lives were lost.  Structures are lost and are replaceable.  Lives are not.

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Ham Lake Fire May 8, 2007

The Bright Side-

The wilderness at the end of the Gunflint Trail remains.  The crystal clear lakes are the same and they are still teeming with fish.  The night sky still holds millions of stars to gaze at.  The songs of birds, spring peepers and loons can  be heard.  Eagles soar overhead and wildlife remains in our forest.  Marsh Marigolds are blooming even where the fire went through.  There are trees standing and the forest will remain, no matter what shape it is in.

More and more people are arriving to help with the fire suppression efforts each day.  They arrive by busloads ready to fight the Ham Lake Fire.  Teams are eager to help and to do what they can to save structures and from keeping the spread of the fire to a minimum.  These people are risking their lives for the sake of other people’s property.

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Ham Lake Fire May 7, 2007

I’ve included a couple of posts about the Ham Lake Fire today.  I’m doing it because during the time the fire was happening I didn’t really have time to tell the whole story about what was going on until a few days into the fire.  It makes more sense to include this information now and I’m going to add some thoughts I didn’t express at the time. I’ll write my thoughts and any new information about the day in italics.

What happened on Sunday, May 6th?

The Ham Lake fire started out slowly on Saturday morning but picked up steam throughout the night.  I planned to attend the 11:00 fire briefing at the Gunflint Fire Hall on Gunflint Lake on Sunday.  I was going to bring my kids to play at Bakers while I was at the meeting, but on my way, I heard Mike on the radio mention the word EVACUATION.  I was driving and stopped to speak to a couple of homeowners who were on the side of the road, watching a fire creep in a swamp towards the Gunflint Trail.  I advised them to go back to their cabin and turned around other cars as they approached me.  I asked them to notify their neighbors and to start their phone trees to alert others of the evacuation.

I proceeded to the fire hall where I quickly dropped the kids off and headed back to the end of the Trail.  Mike had me stop at the Seagull Guard Station where I was to pick up another member of the Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department to help with the evacuation.  We were assigned Gull Lake Lane and Watter’s Point off of Sag Lake Trail.  We drove down every driveway to make sure there was no one home.

Other members of the Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department were assigned to evacuate other residents at the end of the Gunflint Trail.  There were lots of cabins to check down long, curvy, dirt roads with only 8 GTVFD members, 1 border patrol, and a Deputy.  Everything was happening quickly and the fire was moving faster than anyone could keep track of.

Fire wasn’t anything new to most folks on the Gunflint Trail. Some people we encountered on our evacuation route weren’t convinced a wall of fire would soon be there. In my memory I remember a man who was a son-in-law of a man who was “dating” an owner of an outfitter. He was not at all concerned and I’m pretty sure the owner was on the same property, sitting on a porch of a cabin on Sag Lake Trail, enjoying a beer and “watching the smoke.”  I remember thinking, “WTF?”

Two other year round couples didn’t recognize the severity of the situation. They didn’t want to evacuate, didn’t believe the fire would make it to their place and perhaps they were a bit stubborn or foolhearted. I believe they both ended up evacuating but one couple lost their home because they didn’t get their sprinkler system going.

I knew we were in danger at Voyageur and Marilyn, Ian and Theresa were still there.  We hadn’t even thought about starting our sprinklers up and our reliable neighbor Michael Valentini was away for the weekend.  By this time anyone at the end of the Gunflint Trail who hadn’t evacuated immediately was trapped.  The stranded evacuees from our road were staged at the Sag Lake Public Landing.  Theresa and Ian were busy bringing boats around to the public landing in case we needed to evacuate to the North by water.

I remember taking this picture and thinking it might be the last time I see my lodge.

Things were going from bad to worse at the end of the Trail.  Our power was lost, our phone lines were down and we were right in the line of fire.  I needed to find Don so he could get our sprinkler system going, but I couldn’t reach him on the radio.  As I frantically searched the roads for him I ran into a neighbor, Tony Faras and asked him to please go and see if he could start our sprinkler system.

I continued down the Trail and found Don.  He was keeping an eye on the wall of flames that kept jumping the Gunflint Trail, preventing the safe evacuation of residents and the arrival of help.  Mutual Aid from other communities were called in, all volunteer fire departments with a minimum drive of one hour to get to the end of the Trail.

  I went back to Voyageur to evacuate Marilyn, Ian and Theresa.  I told them to load some belongings, the dog, my photo albums and some of the children’s favorite things.  I wanted them out of danger and ready to go as soon as the opportunity to travel back down the Trail arose.

Word finally came that there was a window of opportunity to travel the Trail.  The Fire Trucks, law enforcement, Michael Valentini and Mike headed North and then the remaining evacuees headed south.  By the time the resources were allowed to head north, Seagull Lake was hot with flames.

The wind was strong and relentless.  Volunteers went to cabins that had sprinkler systems installed and attempted to start the pumps.  Since it was so early in the season, most homeowners hadn’t been up the Trail to their cabins so their sprinklers were not ready to run.  They were sitting as they had sat all winter; not primed and not ready to go.

The process of getting pumps started was not going well.  The lake level was about 2 feet lower than normal and some of the water intake hoses were not long enough to reach the water.  Some systems had parts that were broken and there wasn’t time to fix them.

We knew the fire was going to consume the end of the Trail.  There were a few people who were refusing to leave and we did our best to convince them to leave as soon as there was a break in the fire.  I did not want to leave the end of the Trail but when the next opportunity to evacuate arose, Mike assured them I would be joining the caravan.

I wasn’t with the rest of the group because my heart did not want to leave the end of the Trail.  My mind was telling me to go to the kids, but it was not an easy decision to make.  By the time I headed down the Trail flames were jumping every which way.  Tree limbs were falling from the sky, ashes were raining down, and fire consumed both sides of the Gunflint Trail. 

As I sat behind the wheel I wondered what the heck I was doing.  I feared I would come upon a downed tree in the road and be trapped without an escape route.  My car heated up from the intense fire that surrounded it and I feared my tires would melt to the pavement.

Just when I thought I couldn’t stand it any longer the smoke cleared and the flames subsided.  I had made it and I had made it alive.  I remember making it through the wall of frame and on the other side Dan Baumann, GTVFD Fire Chief at the time, was on the side of the road. I came to a stop by the Seagull Guard Station and I rolled my window down.  I don’t know if I said anything or not but I do remember him saying, “WOW, this is the first time I have ever seen Sue Prom look scared.”  I’ll admit I was scared, petrified actually and totally in shock. While I was relieved for my own safety I prayed for all of the others left at the end of the Gunflint Trail.  I didn’t know if they would make it out and I didn’t know if there would be anything left when I returned.

May 7, 2007 Thank God- And everyone else who has prayed, called, volunteered, or expressed well wishes for our safety on the Gunflint Trail.  We can’t say how grateful we are to the Bakers at Gunflint Pines who have given us food, shelter and a place to call home.  They have helped care for our children, our dog, and our cat while we have been busy with the Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department.

I need to thank Mother Nature too.  She didn’t make the winds blow out of control, she kept clouds in front of the sun most of the day and she made the job of the firefighters much easier today.  Everyone involved in the fire fighting efforts has been incredible.  Sprinkler systems were kept running, spot fires were snuffed out with hoses and airplanes were kept busy all day long.  The life of a fire fighter is not a glamorous one.

We thank God and the firefighting personnel for watching over the Gunflint Trail.  So far there have been no lives lost nor any serious injuries.  There have been structures lost; cabins are gone, personal belongings have burned, and the landscape is forever changed.  These are losses but none are as devastating as a loss of life.

Posted in News, wildfire

Ham Fire May 6, 2007

I wrote two entries in my blog on the 6th of May in 2007. One was in the morning and one was in the evening. In the morning we were hopeful the fire was going to burn out into the wilderness and be over and done with. Things changed throughout the day and a battle began.

AM ENTRY- We are all thankful for the efforts of fire fighting crews and their determination to keep Tuscarora out of the fire’s path.  Amazingly, Tuscarora Lodge, their cabins, outfitting buildings and beautiful pine studded property has been saved, like an island oasis.  If you were to sit on a porch and look around the grounds then you would not even know there had been a fire so nearby.  The Ahrendts will soon resume business as usual and their neighbors, friends and guests will be happy to know their Gunflint Trail Paradise still awaits them at Tuscarora Lodge.

…RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 10 AM THIS MORNING TO 8 PM CDT
THIS EVENING…

.TODAY…
SKY/WEATHER………MOSTLY SUNNY.
MAX TEMPERATURE…..64-69.
MIN HUMIDITY……..10-15 PERCENT.
20-FOOT WINDS…….BREEZY. SOUTHEAST WINDS 18 TO 23 MPH WITH GUSTS
TO AROUND 35 MPH.
HAINES INDEX……..5 OR MODERATE.
HOURS OF SUN……..7 HOURS.
PRECIPITATION…….NONE.

View of opening into Seagull Lake from Seagull Outfitters

View from Seagull Lake Landing

PM ENTRY- No lives have been lost and for that we are thankful.  Fire crews showed up from Hovland, Grand Portage, Lutsen, Hovland, Colvill, Maple Hill and Grand Marais Volunteer Fire Departments to risk their lives to help save the lives of others.  That they did.  They worked cooperatively with the Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department to evacuate residents from the end of the Gunflint Trail and to start sprinkler systems at as many cabins and businesses as was humanly possible.  These people are all heroes.  They deserve to be honored for their heroic efforts.

Today was the longest nightmare I have ever experienced.  The wind blew the flames north and wouldn’t quit.  The flames ate everything in their way including buildings and all the trees in their path.  People scurried to get out of the path of the fire and to make their break down the Gunflint Trail to safety.

Tonight we will wait.  We have no idea if we will have a lodge or home to go back to.  But we are all safe and sound for tonight.  Tomorrow will be another fight, a fight with Mother Nature.  Please pray.

End of the Gunflint Trail

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Ham Lake Fire Ten Year Anniversary

As a general rule I don’t re-post blog entries but I am making an exception. With reporters asking questions and folks talking about the ten year anniversary of the Ham Lake Fire I decided to make an exception.  I’m going to re-post my entries from that year.  The photos won’t be the same because I used a different blog platform back then but I’ll try to add some relevant photos once in awhile.

Hopefully I can keep my anxiety level in check when I re-read my entries as it was a very volatile time. I may intersperse with some other blog entries here or there or post more information on Facebook, but then again, maybe not.  As always, thanks for reading.

May 5, 2007

Sometimes you just know when something bad is going to happen.  I woke up with that strange sense of something amiss and when Mike asked about the weather I said the forecast called for 20-30 mile per hour winds the next two days.  I knew with already dry conditions a couple of days of wind would only dry things out more quickly.  As I drove to town I thought to myself, “I hope the winter’s snowfall put out all of the fires from last year, I sure don’t want another fire.”  A few hours later I received a call from Marilyn saying, “Have you heard about the fire?”

Women’s or Sue’s intuition must have been working overtime today because our good friend Sue Ahrendt also had a strange feeling this morning.  She and her husband Andy own Tuscarora Lodge on Round Lake.  They thought they smelled smoke a little after 11:00 this morning and then their suspicions were confirmed quickly.  A fire started on the Northwest end of Ham Lake just southwest of their resort and home.

Mike and Don, both members of the Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department, were alerted to the smell of smoke.  They went to the fire hall, got the fire truck and proceeded to Round Lake Road to investigate.  They saw smoke, urged the Ahrendts to hurry up and then they all headed back out to the Gunflint Trail as flames jumped from tree top to tree top over Round Lake Road.  A few minutes later they would have been cut off from the Gunflint Trail by a huge wall of flames.

   Resources were called in and the fighting of the Ham Lake Fire began.  Only overhead teams were able to work on the fire initially because ground crews were not able to get to Tuscarora Lodge and all of their buildings.  Several aircraft were on scene making drop after drop of fire retardant, foam, and water on the many buildings on the property.  Once the main part of the fire passed Round Lake Road ground crews were sent in. 

The USFS, DNR, Gunflint Trail Volunteer Fire Department, Arrowhead Electric and Cook County Sheriff’s office were all on scene.  Hot spots and snags were everywhere and crews began work immediately. Two bulldozers dug lines around the perimeter while sawyers dropped trees and cleared areas near buildings.  Sprinkler systems were installed on some buildings and around the perimeter by the GTVFD.

  The fire fighting activity lasted all day and well into the evening hour until it was too dark for the aircraft to fly.  Crews will be on scene throughout the evening to help protect the many structures at Tuscarora.  Winds continue to blow from the East South East with gusts up to 20 miles per hour.

The Ham Lake Fire is approximately 1000 acres in size.  According to the Sheriff’s Department the fire was about 3/8 mile by 2 1/2 miles and had spread to around Honker Lake near the Kekekabik Hiking Trail. There have been no reports of lightening strikes in the area so the best guess at how the fire started was by a campfire.  The forecast for tomorrow calls for more ESE winds up to 20 miles per hour.  This will keep the fire heading toward the south of Seagull Lake and areas that have all been treated by prescribed burns done by the USFS since the 1999 Blowdown.    

Many thanks go out to the fast acting crews from all of the entities and volunteers involved.  It is amazing that only one little shed burned and no one has been injured.  Thanks to Shari Baker for watching our kids and to Marilyn who fielded all of the phone calls at Voyageur.  Due to the large volume of phone calls we are receiving we ask you to check the blog or e-mail us with inquiries in regards to the fire.  With Mike, Don and I all working as members of the GTVFD that leaves Marilyn to the office and telephone.

We will update the blog when we know more information.  At this time there are not any closed entry points nor is there a fire ban in the BWCA or Quetico Park. Let’s all do a rain dance and ask Mother Nature to be kind to the Gunflint Trail.

 

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Canoe Fishing Tips

Here’s some great information for the upcoming fishing and paddling season in the BWCA!

From Take me Fishing.org

Canoe Fishing Tips

If you want to catch fish on secluded lakes and streams, canoe fishing may be a good option for you. A fishing canoe can give you the opportunity to enjoy a relaxing day on the water and get some upper-body exercise as you paddle.

These lightweight vessels are very portable with the use of a roof rack or trailer, so they are ideal to use for exploring different fishing spots. However, there are some canoe fishing tips you should know about before paddling off to try fishing from a canoe for the first time.

  • One of the most important canoe fishing tips for first-timers is to bring a friend with you. This way you can both take turns paddling and fishing. Plus, you will have extra help in case you need to paddle through any currents or get tired on the way back.
  • Don’t forget to wear your life jacket or PFD at all times on every canoe trips you take. Make sure anyone else who joins you for a day on the water has a proper fitting PDF as well.
  • Stay centered in the canoe at all times to avoid tipping. This is especially important to remember when casting, fighting a fish, or reeling in a fish. Remember, the more narrow the design of the canoe, the easier it can tip. The best canoe for fishing will be wide enough to offer plenty of stability.
  • Keep your gear minimal and simple. Bring along only the tackle and gear that you know you’ll use. If you plan on targeting smallmouth bass, for example, plan to leave your big tackle box full of muskellunge lures at home.
  • Use waterproof dry bags or gear cases and secure any canoe fishing gear that you aren’t using. This way, if your canoe does tip, your gear will stay dry and you won’t lose anything down at the bottom of a lake or stream.
  • If you are canoe fishing in clear or shallow waters, do your best to approach these types of fishing spots as quietly as possible. In these conditions, fish can easily be scared off by sudden or loud noises. It’s also important to avoid hitting the side of your canoe with your paddle or making any other disturbances.
  • When canoeing from one fishing spot to another, you can troll a spoon behind your canoe and try to catch species like lake trout, northern pike or walleye. When you find a good spot, remember to cast close to any structure or vegetation for your best chance at a bite.

The most important canoe fishing tips to remember are the tips that will keep you safe on the water. Consider taking a boating safety course prior to your first canoe fishing trip because each state has a specific set of safety laws that recreational paddlers and boaters are required to follow. The best canoe trip is a safe canoe trip!

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  • The VCO Crew is back in town! We hope all of you get the chance to come up and meet this wonderful bunch of... t.co/MHHTs5N5ct

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