Living Green

It isn’t earth day quite yet but here is something really interesting. This map makes it impossible to live green, well, live in the green at least. The color green represents places that have no population.  It could be the site of a mall or business development because no one lives there or it could be a truly wild area where no one lives.

I love to look at maps and this map makes me happy because I see quite a bit of green left in the USA. Much of it is in Alaska which reminds me why I don’t want to visit there real soon.  I fear if I go to Alaska to visit then I may never wish to return. In any case, I’m glad to live in an area surrounded by green both on the map and in real life.

Where to Live.

Green Living?

 

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

  • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
  • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

  • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
  • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
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When the Wind Blows

I have a feeling when the wind blows off of Lake Superior this summer it’s going to be cold. The ice coverage on the Great Lakes has been the talk of the winter and for good reason. The lakes reached a peak of 92.2% ice cover this year which isn’t the highest recorded amount of ice coverage but close to the 1979 record of 94.7%.  I was surprised to see so much ice still on a satellite photo of Lake Superior taken on the 16th of April.  No wonder ships are having such troubles on the Great Lakes.

Lake Superior doesn’t usually get too balmy in the summer but there have been recent years when swimming in it is almost enjoyable. I doubt that will be the case this summer. While the rivers on the North Shore may be melting it’s going to take awhile for the ice to be off of Lake Superior. I wonder where ice off will occur first? Lake Superior or our inland lakes on the Gunflint Trail?  I guess we will have to wait and see.

Ice Coverage on Lake Superior

Lake Superior on April 16th, 2014

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Gooseberry in all her Glory

The great thing about Minnesota is the ability to experience the four seasons.  Some seasons are longer than we may like but they sure provide us with some beautiful scenery and things to talk about. I love the fact people share their videos so everyone can experience places they normally wouldn’t visit during the different seasons.  Check out these videos of Gooseberry Falls on Minnesota’s North Shore of Lake Superior in all her Glory.

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Up Next, National Parks Week

Do you have plans to visit a National Park this year for National Parks Week? This weekend there will be free admission to the National Parks and many activities are planned for the week.  I’m not sure of my plans but I do hope to at least get outside and “Go Wild!” as suggested by this year’s slogan.

With 401 units of the National Park System, how do you decide what to do during National Park Week? The folks at the National Park Service and National Park Foundation have some suggestions for you.

This year’s theme, “National Park Week: Go Wild!”, invites visitors to celebrate all that America’s 401 national parks have to offer. With free admission to all parks on April 19 and 20, and exciting activities and programs scheduled throughout the week, National Park Week is the perfect time to discover the diverse wildlife, iconic landscapes, vibrant culture, and rich history found in America’s national parks.

How many of the National Parks have you visited? Check out this neat map and see for yourself. I’m thinking if this new snow we got last night sticks around for the weekend as wild as I get might be making my own bucket list of parks I want to visit.  If I’m really bored then maybe I will figure out which Parks I’ve been too and then develop criteria to describe what “visit” means. Does a picture at the entrance qualify? A souvenir from a store? A photo from the distance? Or do I need to spend a minimum of ten minutes there? Hike a trail? Stay overnight or maybe collect feces from a species? OK, that last one was a little gross and I don’t think the parks want you removing anything from them so we’ll strike that.

In any case, I hope you get out, go wild and explore one of the 401 National Parks this weekend.

 

Here’s a few I’ve visited off the top of my head, how about you?

  • Bryce National Canyon
  • Badlands
  • Carlsbad Caverns
  • Hot Springs
  • Devil’s Tower
  • Yellowstone
  • Grand Canyon
  • Wind Cave
  • Zion
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Voyageur Trading Post

I can check one thing off of my “To Do List.” I have purchased all of the clothing I need for the upcoming season and then some probably.  I’ve brought back some of last year’s favorites and added some new ones too.  It’s always a crap shoot to try to figure out what people will buy each year. If it’s cold we sell more sweatshirts, if it’s hot then more t-shirts. Even though neon colors may be “in” other places I don’t think I would sell much of it at the end of the Gunflint Trail.

I have also purchased almost all of my hats for the store too. One more style to get ordered and I’ll be able to check another thing off of my list.

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Lunar Eclipse

One thing nice about last night’s lunar eclipse was we knew when it was going to be so we could set an alarm clock and not miss it.  I probably wouldn’t have gotten up if Abby hadn’t expressed interest in seeing it but since she wanted to we both went out to see it.

The shadow was just beginning to cover up the moon when we went outside around 1:00am. Just one look and Abby had seen enough. It was a clear, cool night and the moon was big and bright. I saw it earlier in the evening around 9pm and it was huge and gorgeous. Luckily Layne Kennedy stayed up and took some nice pictures so I can share them with you.

Lunar Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse

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Fun Fishing Facts

Less than a month until the Minnesota Fishing Opener but who knows if we’ll have open water or not.  Until then you can entertain yourself with these fun fishing facts provided by the Minnesota DNR.

DNR NEWS – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                  April 14, 2014

Minnesota fishing facts

The following information about fishing can be used in stories in preparation for the fishing opener on Saturday, May 10.

Anglers and waters

About 1.5 million licensed anglers.
About 500,000 people are expected to fish on opening day of the walleye and northern pike season, Saturday, May 10.
Minnesota has 11,842 lakes, 5,400 of which are managed by DNR fisheries. There are 18,000 miles of fishable rivers and streams, including 3,600 miles of trout streams.
Average annual expenditure per angler is about $1,500. 1
Although not every kind of fish lives everywhere, 162 species of fish can be found in Minnesota waters.
Participation and the economy

Fishing contributes $2.4 billion to the state’s economy in direct retail sales, ranking Minnesota fourth in the nation for angler expenditures. 1
Fishing supports 35,400 Minnesota jobs. 1
Minnesota ranks second in resident fishing participation at 32 percent, second only to Alaska. 1
Minnesota is the third most-popular inland fishing destination in the country. 1
Minnesota ranks sixth among states with the highest number of anglers. The top three states are Florida, Texas and Michigan. 1
Who goes fishing

Most resident anglers – 855,000 of them in fact – are from urban areas. The remaining 474,000 resident anglers live in greater Minnesota. 1
Men account for 66 percent of resident anglers. Women account for 34 percent. 1
Fishing habits

Significantly more time is spent fishing on lakes rather than rivers and streams. 1
The average Minnesota angler spends 15 days fishing each year, with 84 percent of resident anglers never fishing anywhere else but Minnesota. 1
The most sought-after fish species, in order of preference, are crappie, panfish, walleye and northern pike. 1
1 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (www.census.gov/prod/www/fishing.html).

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Thinking About Summer

If you haven’t put your canoe trip on the calendar yet then it’s time to do so. I have to do the same thing or the summer flies by without them happening.  The challenge is finding room on the calendar for all of the trips I want to take.

Last year I took Josh and a friend into a secret lake in the BWCA for a few days and they want to do a repeat of it. They had a grand time paddling around the lake, catching fish and swimming.  I also took Josh and 5 of his friends for a basecamp trip on Saganaga for a few nights. They too want to do that trip again this year. Then there’s the church youth group that wants to go out into the Boundary Waters again this summer and my one girlfriend and I want to get out together again. We want to take a family trip and I’d love to get a solo canoe trip in as well.  I fear there aren’t enough days in the summer for all of the paddling and camping I want to do.

If only the paddling season lasted as long as winter has this year.  Hopefully you will be able to get all of the canoe trips you want to take to fit onto your summer calendar, it’s definitely time to start thinking about summer.

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Snowy Sky

After yesterday’s nice and sunny sky today’s sky is a stark contrast. It’s been a dreary day and the sun did not even peek out to say, “Hello.”  We even saw some snow flurries in the sky. I won’t let that dampen my enthusiasm for the nice weather that is eventually going to be the main stay.  While the cold wind may have been blowing it cannot last much longer.  The lakes will thaw, the snow will melt and summer will be here once again.

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What Do the Following Things Have in Common?

Butter Braids, magazines, Schwan’s, Little Ceasars and Special Cookies all have something in common.  They are all things my kids have been trying to sell for fundraisers this year. I used to think having Abby sell Girl Scout Cookies was a pain but now I know that I had barely scratched the surface of fundraising.

I know I shouldn’t complain. I remember selling light bulbs and poinsetta plants door to door when I was a kid but in case you haven’t noticed, times are different these days. Even in the small town of Grand Marais you don’t send your kid door to door. First of all they don’t have any free time to do it, second of all they don’t know everyone and lastly it’s not the smartest or safest thing to do.

I understand fundraising can keep overall costs of a program from being super expensive.  I just sometimes wish they would charge more or offer a buy out because it’s the parents who end up dealing with the deliveries.

I recently heard a friend of mine say, “How many magazine subscriptions does one person need?” One would be too many for me so when I get those envelopes in the mail I just toss them into the garbage. The kids get “points” for just mailing them out anyway.

So, if you ever find yourself in need of a magazine subscription ask me, chances are I could fit it into one of the many fundraisers my kids are doing. And when you come to my house don’t be shocked to find 20 Little Ceasar Pizza Kits, 30 buckets of frozen cookie dough or a stack of Butter Braids in the freezer, it’s a heck of a lot easier just to buy them all and eat them ourselves then ask another person if they want to buy something to help my kid.

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  • Northern Lights anyone? A solar event on the 18th of April will lead to enhanced auroral activity index 4 or... t.co/IZB4Xx5KD3

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